PNG Ranger Training

PNG Ranger program builds resilience in Torres Strait Treaty Villages

Posted on Posted in News

An excellent story from Papua New Guinea’s foremost paper The Post-Courier. Detailing the Building Resilience in the Treaty Villages Program, which is administered by the RRRC. The program is achieving major positive humanitarian outcomes in the Treaty Villages on PNG’s southern border: https://postcourier.com.pg/ranger-program-builds-resilience-torres-strait-treaty-villages/

nitrogen forum

Nitrogen forum brings water quality scientists and cane farmers together

Posted on Posted in News

In a step forward for Great Barrier Reef water quality, scientists and Far North Queensland cane growers will come together to discuss the latest innovations in nitrogen-based fertilizer management to protect both Great Barrier Reef and the sustainability of the sugar cane industry. Excess nitrogen in water flowing out from the Queensland coast can significantly […]

PNG Rangers Cairns

PNG rangers share skills at Cairns forum

Posted on Posted in News

Two rangers from the Building Resilience in the Treaty Villages (BRTV) program in Papua New Guinea’s southern coastal villages have travelled to Australia to share and gain knowledge at a forum for indigenous rangers. The Indigenous Rangers Forum, held in Burketown over 4-6 September, brought together representatives of 72 indigenous ranger groups from all over […]

Great Barrier Reef GBR

RRRC welcomes $500m funding for Great Barrier Reef

Posted on Posted in News

The Reef and Rainforest Research Centre (RRRC), a Cairns-based environmental NGO, has welcomed the announcement of $500 million for Great Barrier Reef protection from the Australian Government in the 2018 Budget. It’s now time to invest in resilience and restoration strategies for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) as climate change and other health impacts continue […]

Keeping an eye on Big Wet runoff

Posted on Posted in News

Every year, major rainfalls in FNQ turn the Barron River and other major watercourses a bright shade of ochre. They pick up mud and silt on their way to the ocean. This year, scientists and farmers are keeping a closer eye on the sediment-filled waters and their effects on the Great Barrier Reef. Read more

Another honour for the far north

Posted on Posted in News

As the first of David Attenborough’s TV program on the Great Barrier Reef aired last night, an Aboriginal art book by a Cairns artist and author, Munganbana Norman Miller, and Adelaide based RenBro Publishing, is the proud recipient of a Bronze Medal from the internationally prestigious and globally recognized Independent Publisher Book Awards – IPPY […]

Long-lasting changes in water clarity in the whole-GBR in response to rivers

Posted on Posted in News

NERP TE Hub Project 4.1 Katharina Fabricius’s paper “Changes in water clarity in response to river discharges on the Great Barrier Reef continental shelf: 2002–2013” is now available online here as open access. Highlights The 344,000 km2 Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is located on a shallow continental shelf. We show wide-spread, long-lasting losses in GBR […]

Rivers of red threaten the future of the reef

Posted on Posted in News

It’s going to take the reinvention of 10,000 farms to improve water quality and repair the Great Barrier Reef, and there’s new evidence that sediment from farms producing Australia’s favourite fruit—bananas—is a growing part of the problem. The bold plan to fix the reef will cost billions but is already facing funding cuts. Gregg Borschmann […]

Give aquaculture a fair go

Posted on Posted in News

The original drafting of the Great Barrier Reef Aquaculture Regulations, did what they were meant to do protect the Great Barrier Reef and the biosecurity for the aquaculture industry. As the then-Director for Water Quality at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, it was my job to draft these Regulations. Read more

Seychelles Must Control Crown-of-Thorns Starfish Outbreak Before Coral Reefs Are Decimated, Says Expert

Posted on Posted in News

Beau-Vallon — Increasing levels of human development in Seychelles coupled with rising sea temperatures have caused an outbreak of venomous starfish that feed on delicate coral reefs, and unless concerted action is taken soon, a large number of reefs within the inner granitic islands of the archipelago could be entirely lost. Read more

Daintree Rainforest Observatory opens

Posted on Posted in News

A new world-class research centre and observatory focusing on the Daintree Rainforest has been opened today. The Member for Leichhardt Warren Entsch said the Daintree Rainforest Observatory was built with $9.7 million from the Australian Government and that it will build on the work already done by James Cook University’s (JCU) Australian Canopy Crane Research […]

Cairns divers told two spikes and you’re out in quest to stop crown-of-thorns starfish

Posted on Posted in News

DIVERS trying to eliminate crown-of-thorns starfish from the Great Barrier Reef will be sacked if they get twice stung by the animals’ venomous spines. The Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators has implemented the tough new “two spikes and you’re out” policy after workplace, health and safety concerns about the venomous creatures. Read more

New partnership to support communities in PNG

Posted on Posted in News

The Australian Government will provide $1.85 million to a two-year pilot program promoting economic and community development and disease prevention in Papua New Guinea’s Western Province. The program is the product of a new partnership between the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Cairns-based Reef and Rainforest Research Centre (RRRC). Read the full […]